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Students And Staff Remember Fallen Soldiers

Poppy Day 1

8:07am 9th November 2012

Over 2,000 students and 200 staff will stand silent today at Thomas Hardye School in Dorchester.

The open air tribute will honour former pupils who've given their lives in armed conflict.

Four students will read a list of their names.

The tribute ahead of Remembrance Sunday this weekend has taken place every year since 1957.

Many Old Hardyeans- old boys of Hardye's School- will be present and Michel Hooper-Immins, President of the Old Hardyeans, will lay a wreath at the Memorial Gates, as will the Chairman of Governors, the Head Boy and the Head Girl. The combined cadet force band will march and stand in the centre of the square in front of the entire school.

"It was 52 years ago- in 1960- that I attended my first Act of Remembrance outside those handsome iron gates and the stone pillars with the wyverns on top. I recall it snowed that day in November 1960 and we all got very cold," reminisces Old Hardyeans' President Michel Hooper-Immins. "Whereas we were around 750 pupils in my time, there are now over 2,200 students and staff- who file quietly out of school just before 11am to take their places silently to honour those Old Grammarians and Old Hardyeans who died in world wars and subsequent conflicts.  It is a supremely dignified tribute by today's young people. I and the Head Teacher are always very proud of them."

Michael Foley and his wife Teresa are guests-of-honour at the Old Hardyeans' London Dinner on Tuesday week [13 November,] which is being held this year in the Dining Room of the Royal Overseas League in St. James's Street.
Founded in 1905 as the Old Grammarians, the Old Hardyeans- also known as the Hardyeans Club- is one of the most successful old school associations in the county, bringing together the old boys of Dorchester Grammar School and Hardye's School, plus ex-students of the modern Thomas Hardye School. In the times of Queen Elizabeth I, it was Thomas Hardye [with a final "e"] described as an yeoman of Frampton, who endowed Dorchester Grammar School in 1569.

Hardye's [shopping] Arcade today stands on the site. The Grammar School moved to Culliford Road in 1928- renamed Hardye's School from 1954. The new Thomas Hardye School in Queens Avenue opened in 1992, encompassing the best traditions of the two previous schools- but admitting girls for the first time since 1569! Writer Thomas Hardy OM, who lived at nearby Max Gate, laid the foundation stone of Hardye's School in 1927. He was no relation to Thomas Hardye, founder of the school, nor of Admiral Thomas Masterman Hardy!

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