Dorset ‘feels safe’ despite concerns over increased crime

Dorset ‘feels safe’ despite concerns over increased crime

Published by The Wessex FM News Team at 8:01am 20th October 2019.

Most Dorset residents feel safe where they live – although more than 30% believe local crime has increased over the past 12 months.

The figures come from the annual Community Safety Survey commissioned by Dorset Police.

survey

Of those who felt that crime had risen, 60% said reporting in the media had caused them to think that way.

The crime that respondents were most worried about:

  • financial crime (57%)
  • having their shed, garage or outbuilding burgled (45%)
  • having their house burgled (35%)
garden-shed

Other concerns included speeding/reckless driving; cars parked illegally, dangerously or inconsiderately and anti-social behaviour and disorder in general.

Four out of ten respondents agreed that the police and local council are working in partnership to deal with anti-social behaviour and crime issues that matter in the area. This represented a 7% point drop from the previous year.

17% of respondents disagreed that the police and local council are working in partnership to deal with anti-social behaviour and crime issues that matter in the area –  a 5% increase from the previous year.

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Rural crime

Another survey, looking at rural crime, concluded that policing of rural communities is poor and much worse than in urban areas.

A report to the Dorset Council Place scrutiny committee on October 24th says:

“Crime, and the fear of crime, is leading to emotional strain and a loss of confidence within rural communities, particularly among young people, families and farmers. Communities believe crime in rural areas is a big problem – and is getting worse.”

Another of the findings concludes: “Rural victims feel angry and annoyed that they are not taken seriously by those in positions of power – and the extent of crime is making communities feel vulnerable.”

The report also says that many rural crimes do not get reported because of the perception that the offence will not be taken seriously, or anything done about it.

By Trevor Bevins, local democracy reporter